How to Start a Journal When Everything Else Hasn’t Worked

Good Morning from sunny (and humid!) South Florida!

So I was brainstorming ways to start out this new journey I have going, and I have decided to start by sharing my experience and struggle with journaling. As my About Me states, my lack of focus-power makes it rather difficult for me to put pen to paper and naturally let the creative juices flow. Not me. Not ever. Or so I thought until I realized my love of deciphering quotes is a type of journal! So I bought a college-ruled notebook and taped quotes that I had saved to my Pinterest  site.

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After my first entry, I found that this is a great self-help remedy and with my therapizing 🙂 training, I could save a little money on therapy. Although I would highly recommend not replacing this with therapy, because it is a completely different level of healing that requires professional guidance.

That said, here is what I found that helped me immensely in starting my writing journey.

 

1. Web is Your Friend

I found everything I needed on Pinterest, mainly because I am a DYI kind of gal. I like to pick and choose to create my own. However, all you need to do is Google anything related to journalling and you are all set! If you are the type to have it done and ready for you, feel free to visit my Etsy site, as I sell a 12 Week Journal Challenge!

https://www.etsy.com/listing/234487364/12-week-daily-journal-challenge?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=12%20week%20journal%20challenge&ref=sr_gallery_1

 

2. Use Quotes

Most of us love quotes! They inspire us, motivate us and most of all, empower us! Make a list of your favorite quotes and write in depth about how you can relate to it, what it means to you, and how you can make improvements in your own life through them. Doing this helped me to start thinking about how and why I was so unhappy with my life. I openly (but subconsciously), behaved like I was unhealthy and had difficulty relating to the positive supports and friends with whom I had surrounded myself.

 

3. Prompts

Answering questions and filling in blanks is a very easy way to help your brain start to think about things about you and bigger than you. This is also great for self exploration and defining your values! For example, one my first prompts asked me to use one word to describe myself. This really got me thinking about how I perceive myself and how I thought people perceived me. When I realized that I was not presenting myself in a way that was congruent with who I am as a person, I worked on changing that. Today, I have much less anxiety because I know that I am behaving according to my moral code.

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4. Art

Art Journaling is a quite challenging feat mainly because many of us do not consider ourselves to be the creative type. Look at it this way, your creativity is like a muscle, it becomes more healthy and toned the more work you put into it. Like doing lunges, the more you practice, the tighter the toosh! Same works for art. The key to this is to remember that there is no right or wrong way to be creative. It is all within you and how you view things. That said, try an art journal challenge!

5. Don’t Give Up and Don’t Beat Yourself Up

There will days, mornings nights when I am exhausted from work, think I am too busy to set aside time to write, or just plain don’t want to. These are the times where it will be crucial for you to complete your entry. Also, if you do miss a day, practice self compassion. I tell myself that I am human and am not perfect at everything (no matter how hard I try or how hard I am on myself). This gave me the power to keep at it and not give up. After about three months of journaling, I felt like a new person with a new, enlightened point of view and a new appreciation for life!

 

"If you do what you have always done, you will get what you have always got." 
-Henry Ford

 

 

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